Tallinn Fashion Week 2014 subtleties.

Keep it secret, keep it safe. October 2014.

Keep it secret, keep it safe. October 2014.

Sharing couple of thoughts about shooting at Tallinn Fashion Week 23.-26. October 2014. Photographically speaking shooting catwalk models walking in spotligh on dark backround is not just exercise in contrast. Its also keeping subtle black details visible on black backrounds without loosing those highlighted skintones. Mainly exercise on exposure and dynamic range. One important tip to remember here – know your cameras sensor limits on dynamic range and set your exposure accordingly. This is one of the few things where you are in charge. Continue reading

1D X and D4: Conclusions

Is time to draw some conclusions and share some of my my personal thoughts about those cameras.

Väljaprint ( 300 dpi). Niisugune näeb tegelikkuses välja suurusevahe 18 MP (all) ja 16 MP(ülal) puhul.

Print ( 300 dpi). Above 16 MP and below 18 MP pictures. You can can see the size difference, but its quite small.

Output – prints: I also printed out the comparison images with typical 300 dpi resolution that gives you approximately A3 size prints. Printing those images clearly reduces perceptible noise and adds value by making those moments more tangible. The differences between the D4 and 1D X become even smaller. Continue reading

1D X and D4: At the Limits of Exposure

In this second synthetic test of our 1D X and D4 evaluation, we are going to look at dynamic range, or more simply put, we’ll test how much usable detail we can push up from the darkest areas and pull back from the brightest areas in the RAW files of these cameras. Previous articles in the series:

If you are a photographer, you can probably guess which half of the image below offers a greater chance of recovering a usable image:

Left half: 5 stops underexposed, right half: 3 stops overexposed

Left half 5 stops underexposed, right half 3 stops overexposed

We had a pretty good idea, too, but decided to test it anyway and in the process, compared how good the cameras in our test are at recovering information from under- and overexposed areas of the RAW image. Continue reading

1D X and D4: In the Studio

Red Lips. January 2013 (Nikon D4)

Red Lips. January 2013 (Nikon D4)

Most studio images in our country are shot on crop sensor or 35mm full frame cameras. The jobs are done, the clients are generally satisfied and don’t know what else to wish for. Still, it’s good to know that even in photography there are generally optimal tools for particular genres. For reportage and documentary work – 35mm full frame cameras, for portraiture – medium format cameras and wide format cameras for landscape. Continue reading

1D X and D4: Action in Poor Light

Take-off. January 2013 (Canon 1D X)

Take-off. January 2013 (Canon 1D X)

We continue our high-end camera testing with some practical action shooting in poor light conditions. Previous articles in the series:

This is the story of D4 and 1D X in their natural environment – in poor lighting conditions, catching fast movement. Continue reading

1D X and D4: Testing the ISOs

As the first part of our testing we put together an ISO noise test against several other cameras. If you’d like to read our series of posts on the 1D X and the D4 from the beginning, the introductory post was:

So, in addition to putting the cameras through their paces in real-life shooting, we also wanted to do some more controlled testing, so we set up a test scene at the studio. There are more details on the test setup at the end of the post, but for now, let’s take a look at the test scene:

Test Scene - 1D X @ ISO 102400

Test Scene – 1D X @ ISO 102400

Continue reading

1D X and D4: Kings of the Hill?


We are going to kick off here by comparing two top-of-the-line sports cameras from Canon and Nikon – the 1D X and the D4. For real-world testing, we shot some indoor sports in pretty lousy lighting; there will also be some pixel-peeping for noise, raw file flexibility and video quality.

We also shot these cameras in a studio setting and compared them to several other full-frame models and a lonely APS-C contender we had lying around – that was never going to be a pretty sight. We’ll be talking about how these cameras were to shoot with and provide our answer to the big question – are these beasts worth their 6000 euro asking prices? Continue reading